IN THIS SECTION

Subjects

    Courses available to KS4 students

    At Sir Graham Balfour we offer the following GCSE courses:

    Art

    Biology*

    Business Studies

    Chemistry*

    Child Development

    Computing

    Engineering

    English (Language and Literature, compulsory study of both, worth 2 GCSEs)

    Food Technology

    French

    Geography

    German

    Graphics

    Health and Social Care

    History

    IT

    Maths

    Music

    Philosophy and Ethics

    Physical Education

    Physics*

    Resistant Materials

    Science (Core in Year 10, Additional in Year 11)

    Spanish

    Textiles

     

    *= whilst these are examined separately, Biology, Chemistry and Physics must all be followed as ‘Separate Sciences’, leading to the award of three GCSEs

    In addition to the above, we do offer a small number of BTEC courses for selected students.  These are currently: BTEC Certificate for IT Users, BTEC Certificate in Business and Enterprise, BTEC Certificate in Travel and Tourism.

    All students will follow core PE and SMSC (Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural studies), although neither is formally examined.

     

     

     

    The Curriculum

    English

    It is our vision in the English Faculty to create independent learners.  We have designed an engaging curriculum which covers a wide variety of different texts suited to   all learners. From Year 7 students begin on a pathway meet their academic potential and to become successful readers, writers and speakers.  We actively encourage discussion and team work in the classroom to encourage students to use skills which will prepare them for life outside of school. The new curriculum begins in Year 7.  We use the information we receive from Primary Schools to place students in appropriate groups and to ensure that their transition to our school is as seamless as possible. Initially, Year 7s enjoy a two to three week transition unit which gives them time to settle in and understand our high expectations of both attitude and behaviour.  Once settled in, their learning journey begins with autobiographical reading and writing.  Classes work at their own pace and each teacher keeps a close eye on students’ individual progress.  Our hope is that each child makes their expected progress and that they flourish; becoming confident in all English skills.

    This journey takes students all the way to Year 11, when they are prepared thoroughly for their terminal examinations.  All students will be prepared for both the English Language GCSE and Literature GCSE.  Occasionally, a teacher may decide that students might fare better focusing on only English Language, but it is our belief that the study of Literature is valuable, and helps to strengthen students’ use of language in their own writing.  Furthermore, when we study texts we also study their social, historical and moral contexts which only help children in their understanding of the world around them. Throughout the five year curriculum, formative and summative assessment informs the class room teacher of student progress. Students will study texts such as ‘Boy’ by Roald Dahl in Year 7, ‘Private Peaceful’ by Morpurgo in Year 8, ‘Of Mice and Men’ by Steinbeck in Year 9, ‘Animal Farm’ by Orwell in Year 10 and Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’ in Year 11. They will also study a wide variety of poems and a few short stories along the way.  Students will be given many opportunities to improve their writing, including revising and practising grammar, punctuation and spelling; they will write letters, speeches, advertisements, short stories, journals, new articles; all designed to encourage creativity and versatility in their writing.

    Sixth Form

    Students study the new A Level curriculum, which is a two year course with terminal examination Love Through the Ages focusing on different aspects of ‘love’ presented in different time periods and by different writers. This year they are studying Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’ – a desperate tale of jealousy and ‘The Great Gatsby’ a classic American novel about lost love.  Following this, they will undertake the non-examination assessment which is a single essay based on two texts of their choice.  In order to support students, we teach one novel to the class (for example The Picture of Dorian Gray) and then give students the option to choose one text to compare and contrast to the class reader; or should they have the ability to, they can have the freedom of choosing both texts.  This is an interesting unit and one which the students enjoy.  It teaches them close reading skills, independent and analytical thought, how to use critical views and how to plan, draft and improve their work.  In Year 13, they go on to study texts based on and set in World War One.

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    Maths

     

    Year 7 and Year 8

    Students follow the Key stage 3 National Curriculum for Mathematics. Areas covered are Number, Ratio and proportion, Algebra, Shape and Measures and Data Handling. Further details are available at www.education.gov.uk 

    Year 9

    Students study the first year of EDEXCEL GCSE (9-1) Mathematics (1MA1) at either Higher or Foundation Tier. Course specification available at www.EDEXCEL.com

    Year 10

    Students study the second year of EDEXCEL GCSE (9-1) Mathematics (1MA1) at either Higher or Foundation Tier. Course specification available at www.EDEXCEL.com

    Year 11

    Students study the third year of EDEXCEL GCSE (9-1) Mathematics (1MA1) at either Higher or Foundation Tier. Course specification available at www.EDEXCEL.com

    Year 12

    Students study OCR MEI Mathematics (3895) taking modules in Core 1 (4751), Core 2 (4752) and Statistics (4766). Course specification available at www.ocr.org.uk

    In addition students can study OCR MEI Further Mathematics (3896) taking modules in Further Pure 1 (4755), Mechanics 1 (4761) and Decision Mathematics 1 (4771). Course specification available at www.ocr.org.uk

    Year 13

    Students study OCR MEI Mathematics (7895) taking modules in Core 3 (4753), Core 4 (4754) and Statistics (4767). Course specification available at www.ocr.org.uk

    In addition students can study OCR MEI Further Mathematics (7896) taking modules in Further Pure 2 (4756), Mechanics 2 (4762) and Decision Mathematics 2 (4772). Course specification available at www.ocr.org.uk

     

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    Science

    Our aim in the Science Faculty is to ensure that all students are engaged by the subjects we cover. As well as learning about how the world around us works we aim to ensure that there is time for fun. Students should be aware of Science as a vibrant and relevant subject; they should be able to see how the subject affects their daily life, socially, politically and ethically.

    Years 7, 8 & 9

    Key stage 3 is divided into 4 subject areas:

    1. Organisms, behaviour and health.
    2. Chemical and material behaviour.
    3. Energy, electricity and forces.
    4. Environment, Earth and the Universe
       

    We teach the course in a range of assessed units and there are frequent assessments throughout the years and the results of these inform our setting arrangements. In this way we can provide the stretch and challenge needed to achieve the highest grades and the greatest understanding.

    We address the following areas:

    • Key concepts: scientific thinking, the applications and implications of science, cultural understanding, and collaboration between students.
    • Key processes: practical and enquiry skills, critical understanding of evidence, communication in a variety of ways.
    • Curriculum opportunity: these are designed to encourage independent enquiry, the use of real life examples, contemporary and historical perspectives.

    Over the 3 years of the course students will explore these subject areas in a variety of ways including:

    Experimentation, research, discussion, group work, comprehension activities, in-house all year activity weeks.

    Preparing for the rigours of the GCSEs with careful testing to encourage knowledge retention and understanding of the work

    Years 10 & 11

    Combined Science GCSE

    • All students will sit will sit 2 GCSEs in Science in the May of Year 11, the course will consist of Biology, Chemistry and Physics taught separately and examined separately.
    • There is no coursework component although a significant proportion of the exams will be about Scientific method
    • As yet we are reviewing the different syllabuses from the examination boards but the content of all is the same as are the examination requirements.
    • The course may be taught in modules
    • There are 6 exam papers at the end of Year 11: 2 Biology, 2 Chemistry, and 2 Physics
    • Each paper has multiple choice questions, short and long answer questions there are 2 levels : Foundation and Higher
    • The grades will run from 1 ( the lowest) to 9 (the highest)
       

    Each subject will have 2 papers in year 11; each of 1Hour and 15 minutes duration containing the range and style of questions that are in the combined science qualification.

     

    Separate Science GCSE

    • We provide students with the opportunity to do the three Sciences as separate GCSEs and historically these groups have tremendous success and, as such, is extremely popular.
    • As with the Combined Science the choice of syllabus will be made shortly
    • Students will be expected to have achieved level 6 or above at Key Stage 3 to access these courses
    • Students will sit the exams at the end of Year 11.
    • There is no coursework but these heavily practical courses will have the skills acquired examined in the terminal exams
    • Science at Key Stage 4 is well resourced, our Technical Support team ensure that the courses have a high level of practical and experimental input, the lessons are available for students to use as revision materials on the VLE and the textbooks are available in electronic format for students to use at home.
       

    The aim is to ensure that students can assimilate the large body of knowledge required as the course progresses and that students feel comfortable with the application of this knowledge.

     Regardless of the course that a student follows in Keystage 4 the content is split into the following headings

     More details acan be found at www.aqa.org.uk

    BIOLOGY

    CHEMISTRY

    physics

    Cell biology

    • Organisation

    • Bioenergetics

    • Infection and response

    • Homeostasis and response

    • Inheritance, variation and evolution

    • Ecology

    Atomic structure and the periodic table

    • Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter

    • Quantitative chemistry

    • Chemical changes

    • Energy changes

    • The rate and extent of chemical change

    • Organic chemistry

    • Chemical analysis

    • Chemistry of the atmosphere

    • Using resources

    Forces

    • Waves

    • Magnetism and electromagnetism

    • Energy

    • Electricity

    • Particle model of matter

    • Atomic structure

    We want our students to be able to begin to understand the wonder of the world in which we live, and to that end a guiding principle is to apply the world of Science to everyday life. The courses we offer allow students to be fully aware of how science impacts upon their lives, as well as the social and political implications of the material.

    Our aim of a Key Stage 4 course is to produce scientifically knowledgeable and responsible citizens, aware of how technology works and how it can change the world.

    Years 12 & 13

    The A levels in Biology, Chemistry and Physics are examined at A2 at the end of year 13. Biology and Physics follow the AQA syllabus A and Chemistry follows the OCR syllabus A. further details of these courses can be found at www.OCR.org.uk and www.AQA.org.uk
     

    Biology (7402)

    COURSE CONTENT:

    1 Biological molecules

    2 Cells

    3 Organisms exchange substances with their environment

    4 Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms

    5 Energy transfers in and between organisms

    6 Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments

    7 Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems

    8 The control of gene expression

    Assessment in the May of Year 13

     

    There is a considerable amount of practical work and students are assessed to see if they can achieve the Practical Endorsement for Biology. This separate endorsement of practical skills will be taken alongside the A-level. This will be assessed by us and will be based on direct observation of students’ competency in a range of skills that are not assessable in written exams.

    However the final exams will examine the students practical competencey.

    A-level grades will be based only on marks from written exams.

    Chemistry

    The specification is divided into chemical topics, each containing different key concepts of Chemistry.  Once the key features of a chemical topic have been developed, applications are considered.  For assessment purposes, knowledge and understanding of key concepts are treated separately in Y12; important links between different areas of chemistry are largely assessed synoptically in Y13.  While the teaching of practical skills may be integrated with the theoretical topics, they are assessed separately.  This allows skills to be developed in a way suited to each centre.

     COURSE CONTENT

    YEAR 12

    Module title and description

    Assessment method and weighting

    F321: Atoms, Bonds and Groups

    • Atoms and Reactions

    • Electrons, Bonding and Structure

    • The Periodic Table

    1hour 15 minutes written exam

    AS level -  30%

    A2 level -  15%

    F322: Chains, Energy and Resources

    •  Basic Concepts and Hydrocarbons

    •  Alcohols, Halogenoalkanes and Analysis

    •  Energy

    •  Resources

    1hour  45 minutes written exam

    AS  level – 50%

    A2 level –   25%

    F323: Practical Skills in Chemistry

    •  AS internal assessment

    Internal Assessment

    AS level -  20%

    A2 level -  10%

    YEAR 13

    Module title and description

    Assessment method and weighting

    F324: Rings, Polymers and Analysis

    •  Rings, Acids and Amines

    •  Polymers and Synthesis

    •  Analysis

    1 hour 15 minutes written exam

    A2 level - 15%

    F325: Equilibria, Energetics and Elements

    •  Rates, Equilibrium and pH

    •  Energy

    •  Transition Elements

    1 hour 45 minutes written exam

    A2 level – 25%

    F326: Practical Skills in Chemistry 2

    • A2 internal assessment
     

    Internal assessment

    A2 level – 10%

    Physics A Level

    At a Glance

    Course title:                                   AQA : A Physics

    Examination Board:                         AQA

    Entry Requirements:                       Science or Physics at GCSE grade B or above

     

    Overview

    Physics is the study of the properties and interactions of matter and energy. Our understanding of many features of the everyday world relies on knowledge drawn from the ideas and methods of Physics. In this course the basic principles of Physics are introduced and, through example, placed in the context of the world in which Physics is used.

    Students may go on to study Physics, Physics related courses, Engineering, and many other subjects depending on ‘A’ Level combination, at University.

    Employers rate Physics qualifications very highly, so by studying Physics you will access a surprising variety of jobs. It opens the doors to an amazing world with opportunities for jobs in the field of Health and Medicine, Leisure, Energy, Communications, Space, Environment, Education, Transport, Government and many, many more – the list is almost endless!

    Year 12

     

    Paper

    Modules

    Marks

    Duration

    Weighting

    1

    Breadth in Physics

    Modules    1,2,3,4

    70

    1hr 30 mins

    50%

    Section A Multiple Choice

    20

    Section B  Structured questions covering theory and practical skills

    50

    2

    Depth in Physics

    Modules  1,2,3,4

    Structured questions and extended response questions covering theory and practical skills

    70

    1hr 30 mins

    50

    Year 13

     

    Paper

    Modules

    Marks

    Duration

    Weighting

    1

    Modelling Physics

    Modules    1,2,3,5

    100

    2hr 15 mins

    37%

    Section A Multiple Choice

    15

    Section B  Structured questions covering theory and practical skills

    85

    2

    Exploring Physics

    Modules  1,2,4,6

    Structured questions and extended response questions covering theory and practical skills

    70

    1hr 30 mins

    37%

    3

    Unified Physics

    All modules

    Structured questions and extended response questions covering theory and practical skills

    70

    1hr 30 mins

    26%

    Non exam

    Practical endorsement for Physics

    Pass/Fail

    -

    Reported separately

    Module 1 – Development of practical skills in physics

    1.1 Practical skills assessed in a written examination

    1.2 Practical skills assessed in the practical endorsement

    Module 2 – Foundations of physics

    2.1 Physical quantities and units

    2.2 Making measurements and analysing data

    2.3 Nature of quantities

    Module 3 – Forces and motion

    3.1 Motion

    3.2 Forces in action

    3.3 Work, energy and power

    3.4 Materials

    3.5 Momentum

    Module 4 – Electrons, waves and photons

    4.1 Charge and current

    4.2 Energy, power and resistance

    4.3 Electrical circuits

    4.4 Waves

    4.5 Quantum physics

    Module 5 – Newtonian world and astrophysics

    5.1 Thermal physics

    5.2 Circular motion

    5.3 Oscillations

    5.4 Gravitational fields

    5.5 Astrophysics and cosmology

    Module 6 – Particles and medical physics

    6.1 Capacitors

    6.2 Electric fields

    6.3 Electromagnetism

    6.4 Nuclear and particle physics

    6.5 Medical imaging

     

    Return to Subject list

    24/11/16

     

    Geography

    In Geography from Year 7 to Year 9 students will focus on developing their essential Geographical Skills and fundamental Geographical Knowledge through the study of a range of fantastic and interesting places and regions around the world.

    Year 7

    Cambodia – What makes Cambodia Distinctive? – Investigating the people and places that make Cambodia unique.

    Know your place – Where are we in the world? – Investigating where we are located in the world and how we can use a range of geographical skills and key terminology to locate our place accurately.

    Fantastic Places – What makes our planet so fantastic? – Investigating some of the wonders of our world and some of the most unique and interesting places on our planet such as Las Vegas and The Grand Canyon to understand the Geography of these places

    California – What makes California distinctive? Investigating the people and places that make California unique through topics such as population growth, migration, urbanisation in Los Angeles, Earthquakes.

    Flood – What are the causes and consequences of flooding? – Investigating the causes and impacts of floods in the UK and other countries in order to understand how river floods can be managed

    Year 8

    Mumbai – What are the consequences of rapid urban growth? – Investigating the problems created in Mega Cities when rapid urban growth occurs – particularly focussing on the development of Slums.

    New Zealand – What makes New Zealand distinctive? – Investigating the landscape of New Zealand and how it is shaped by physical processes such as volcanoes and earthquakes and erosion and weathering by rivers, the sea and glaciers.

    Fantastic Places – What makes our planet so fantastic? – Investigating some of the wonders of our world and some of the most unique and interesting places on our planet such as Iceland and Manchu Picchu to understand the Geography of these places

    Biodiversity – Is the Biodiversity of our planet under threat? – Investigating what Biodiversity is through the key Tropical Rainforest Biome and how human activity is placing it under threat.

    China – Is China the world’s next SuperPower? – Investigating the economic growth of China in our globalised world and the consequences for the rest of the world?

    Year 9

    Japan – How does Japan cope with its Tectonic Challenges? – Investigating the causes, Impacts and potential solutions to tectonic challenges such as Earthquakes and Tsunami’s in Japan.

    Sub Saharan Africa – Why is Sub-Saharan Africa being left behind? – Investigating why the Sub Saharan region of Africa contains so many of the world poorest nations, looking at issues such as desertification, war and conflict, piracy and resource issues.

    Fantastic Places – What makes our planet so fantastic? – Investigating some of the wonders of our world and some of the most unique and interesting places on our planet such as Kilimanjaro and The Outback to understand the Geography of these places.

    Tourism – How can the impacts of the growing tourist industry be managed? – Investigating the causes and consequences of the rapid growth of tourism and the potential solutions to the problems it creates in places such as Thailand and The Maldives.

    Climate Change – How is human activity threatening our planet and how can these threats be reduced? Investigating the causes and consequences of climate change and how sustainable development strategies can offer solutions.

    Years 10 & 11

    At GCSE we follow the AQA specification. From this specification we study the following modules across Year 10 and Year 11, all of which build directly on the work done by students in Year 7 to Year 9.

    Urban Issues and Challenges – Investigating global patterns of urbanisation and the opportunities and challenges presented by the growth of urban areas in the UK and in developing countries.

    The Changing Economic World – Investigating how global economic activity has changed over time in the UK and other specific countries and the consequences of these changes for our country and other areas of the world.

    The Challenge of resource management – Investigating the challenges faced by our planet and the people on it in terms of supplying and using key resources such as food, water and energy.

    The Challenge of Natural Hazards – Investigating the causes and consequences of volcanoes, earthquakes and the potential management options available. Investigating the causes and consequences of meteorological hazards such as Tropical Storms and Drought and long term hazards such as Climate Change.

    The Living World – Investigating the key features of both small UK ecosystem and major global biomes such as Tropical Rainforests, how they operate, why they are important and how they are under threat.

    Physical Landscapes in the UK – Investigating how the physical landscape of the UK has been shaped over time by key process of erosion, weathering and mass movement associated with Rivers, The Sea and Glaciers.

    Issues Analysis and Fieldwork Skills – students will also be assessed on their Geographical skills in areas of issue analysis and decision making as well as essential fieldwork skills.
     

    Year 12 & 13

    At A Level we follow the EDEXCEL specification. From this specification we study the following areas of Study.

    Area of Study 1: Dynamic Landscapes

    Tectonic Processes and Hazards – Investigating in detail the causes of tectonic hazards and how they can be managed through well planned responses and effective mitigation and adaptation strategies

    Coastal Landscapes and Change – Investigating how coastal processes shape our country and produce distinctive landscapes which are becoming increasingly threatened by physical processes and human activity leading to the need for sustainable management

    Area of Study 2: Dynamic Places

    Globalisation – Investigating how and why globalisation continues to accelerate and change the world for both good and bad, creating opportunities and challenges.

    Regenerating Places – Investigating the strategies used to regenerate both urban and rural areas of the UK in the face of significant economic and political change over the last 30 years.

    Area of Study 3: Physical Systems and Sustainability

    Water Cycle and Water Insecurity – Investigating the vital role water plays in supporting life on earth through the water cycle and how physical and human processes are causing change and creating water insecurity on a global and local level.

    Carbon Cycle and Energy Security – Investigating why a balanced carbon cycle is vital for maintaining planetary health and how human activity, particularly energy generation, has changed the balance of the cycle and resulted in threats to future energy security.

    Area of Study 4: Human Systems and Geopolitics

    SuperPowers – Investigate the current and future global geopolitical situation in the world, how countries develop superpower status and how they impact on the global economy, global politics and the environment.

    Migration, Identity and Sovereignty – Investigate the tensions that can result from globalisation and the pressure it places on the environment, people and the national sovereignty of nation states as well as how these pressures can be managed through global governance.

    Independent Investigation

    Students are required to complete an independent investigation of between 3000 and 4000 words. Students define the question or issue within the content of the specification and based on the fieldwork days that will be undertaken during the summer of Y12.


    An awareness of current issues in the news that relate to Geography by reading a newspaper or news based internet sites such as www.bbc.co.uk/news would also be of value.
    Revision websites such as http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/geography/http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/

    09/11/16

    History

    Years 7, 8 & 9

    At Key Stage 3 we have created a scheme of work that engages and enthuses students through a range of learning activities and explores British History from 1066 – 1945. We feel it is important that students gain an understanding of Britain’s development and how this has shaped the society which they live in. To aid student’s exploration of British history we use a range of key questions to focus their studies.
    For example students explore the following questions:

    • How did William gain control after 1066?  
    •How did urbanisation change the United Kingdom?

    ●Why did the Treaty of Versailles fail to keep the peace?
    •How difficult was life in the trenches during the Great War?

    To support the student’s investigations, we work on developing a range of skills such as using historical information to development arguments in written work, exploring the concepts of change and continuity, the ability to analyse and interpret historical sources as well as fostering independent learning skills. Developing these skills will help to produce rounded historians and prepare students for our GCSE course but we also believe these skills are freely transferable to other subjects.

    Years 10 & 11     

    Students follow the Edexcel GCSE (9-10) course that is made up of 4 main elements that are divided across three examined units at the end of the course:

    Paper 1 - is made up of a breadth study exploring Crime and Punishment from C1000 – to the present day and a depth study on Whitechapel c1870-1900. Students will explore such issues as: the changing definitions of crime from vagabonds, witchcraft, smuggling, drug offences and racial discrimination. They will investigate case studies on trial by ordeal, the Gunpowder plot, the Witch Finder General, Conscientious objectors and the end of the death penalty in Britain.  Finally, they will study the problems of Whitechapel in London and the infamous case of Jack the Ripper.

    Paper 2 – is made up of two distinct areas of study one being a British depth study focused on Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, 1060-1088 and a period study focused on The American West, 1835 – 1895. With the depth study students will explore areas such as: Anglo Saxon Society, the House of Godwin, Claimants to the English throne, the Battle of Hastings, development of Castles, revolts of the earls, the Feudal system as well as the death of William I. With the period study students will explore such topics as the Plains Indians and their way of life, the Gold Rush, problems of migration, the American Civil War, growth of the cattle industry, cowboys and the Johnson County Wars as well as the destruction of the Plains Indians.

    Paper 3 – is a modern depth study on Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918 – 1939. With this paper student’s will explore some of the following: creation of the Weimar government, impact of the Treaty of Versailles, ‘Golden years’ of the Weimar, creation of the Nazi party, Hitler rise to power, creation of a dictatorship and life in Nazi controlled Germany.  

    The students are examined using knowledge of the topics studied, interrogation of sources and through the use of historical interpretations.

     Years 12 & 13

    Students follow the Pearson Edexcel Advanced GCE course studying 4 distinct modules over the 2 year course. We fully believe this qualification builds upon the skills developed by students at GCSE, adds significant challenge and provides students with a well-regarded qualification for their future careers. They are able to explore a range of historical topics from the European witch craze, the rise and fall of the Stuart era and Russia in Revolution, refining their source analysis skills and developing their analytical arguments

    The modules which students follow are:

    • Unit 1 – Revolutions in early modern and modern Europe: Britain, 1625–1701: conflict, revolution and settlement.

    • Unit 2 – Revolutions in early modern and modern Europe: Russia in revolution, 1894–1924.

    • Unit 3 – The witch craze in Britain, Europe and North America, c1580–c1750.

    • Unit 4 – Historical Enquiry: The nature and topic of the enquiry question is open to negotiation with the student allowing for personalisation of this module. All we will ask of students is that they generate a suitable complex and interesting question where the key focus has generated disagreement between historians.

    Units 1 & 3 are both worth 30% of the final GCE qualification assessed at the end of the two-year qualification.

    Unit 2 & 4 are both worth 20% of the final GCE qualification assessed at the end of the two year qualification.

     

     

    09/11/16

    ICT/Computing

    The aim of the ICT Department is to equip our students in as many ways as possible to meet the technological and information-centred challenges of a continually changing e-world. As more and more of our daily work and leisure lives become increasingly dependent on digital networks, the Internet and the microchip, it is vital that we foster in our students healthy, productive and creative relationships with these technologies and systems. We aim to develop the practical, intellectual and independent learning capabilities of our students so that they can confidently and wisely engage with ever-evolving technologies well into the 21st century.  

    ICT is taught both as a discreet subject and cross-curricular thereby promoting the essential role that ICT plays in life in the modern world.

    On joining the school, the students are given the responsibility for their own user area and e-mail accounts. They are encouraged to use the facilities during lesson times, break, lunchtime and after school

    Students are encouraged to develop appropriate techniques across a wide variety of applications software programmes through problem solving; designing systems for audiences; linking of experiences from other curriculum areas and individual creativity.

    Key Stage 3

    Computing is taught as a discrete subject. Students in Year 7 and 8 have four lessons a fortnight for a period of 13 weeks. Year 9 have 3 lessons a fortnight throughout the whole year.

    In Year 7, 8 and 9 students will be given an introduction into Computer Science, including planning, programming, algorithms and computer architecture. They will be encouraged to think logically and independently to solve computational problems and thorough understanding of computing concepts will give them the tools to transfer their learning to other problems in the future. 

    All KS3 students learn about E-SAFETY topics like social networking websites, dangers of sharing personal information online, What is cyber-bullying? Identity theft, dangers of file-sharing over the Internet, What are viruses? and how to stay safe online. The main purpose of these lessons is to educate and inform our students so that they are empowered to make safe, intelligent and mature decisions when they are online. The Key Stage 3 curriculum will develop their skills in Computational thinking and digital literacy giving them the fundamental skills to progress to either Computing or ICT at Key Stage 4.

    Year 7

    Unit 7.0– An introduction to the network, printing and gateway.

    Unit 7.1– An introduction to e-safety, focusing on measures to protect themselves from dangers.

    Unit 7.2– Visual programming, game creating and marketing with Microsoft’s Kodu.

    Unit 7.3– An introduction to data types and binary numbers.

     

    Year 8

    Unit 8.1– Students will learn to create websites using HTML coding and the importance of using correct and accurate syntax. The site they create will be based on e-safety issues and aimed at Year 7 students.

    Unit 8.2– What is a computer? This unit will allow students to explore inside the computer and they will explore the history of computer architecture. This unit will develop the concepts covered in Unit 7.3.

    Unit 8.3- Students will look at using VBA in PowerPoints to make interactive multimedia products.

     

    Year 9

    Unit 9.1– Students will create an effective and professional database, ensuring at each stage that it is suitable for the audience and the purpose. They will learn about Boolean operators while searching their databases. They will look at the SQL code that underpins the database queries.

    Unit 9.2- Students will use Web Authoring software to create a professional website. They will cover areas of digital literacy to produce a suitable product and learn how to combine HTML elements from Unit 8.1 with Web Authoring software.

    Unit 9.3 – Introduction to micro:bit – the micro:bit is a handheld, fully programmable computer given to every school in the UK. It’s 70 times smaller and 18 times faster than the original BBC Micro computers used in schools in the early 1980s. This little device has a lot of features, like 25 red LED lights that can flash messages. There are two programmable buttons that can be used to control games or pause and skip songs on a playlist. It can detect motion and tell you which direction you’re heading in, and it can use a low energy Bluetooth connection to interact with other devices and the Internet!

    Students will use the device to make all sorts of cool creations, games, simulated pets even robots or musical instruments – the possibilities are endless.  Students will learn to write code, run code on micro:bit and will gain experience in debugging.

    Unit 9.4 - Python will allow students their first experience of textual programming, developing the concepts previously learnt in visual programming units. Python is a fully featured interpreted language and one of the most popular programming languages in the world. It’s is used extensively in industry and considered to be one of the best starting languages for learning programmers.

    Unit 9.5– Students will use a range of spread sheet features such as IF statements, macros and validation to create an interactive, self-marking quiz on e-safety.

    Year 10 and Year 11

    Computing – OCR GCSE Computing Specification J275

    Students must complete 2 Exams and one Controlled Assessment assigned by OCR. They are internally assessed against OCR criteria and externally moderated.

    In year 10, students will learn theory needed for the 2 exams. During this time, they will complete on a number of programming projects developing their programming skills and embedding additional skills such as analysis, design and computational thinking skills they will need for the Controlled Assessment project.

    In Year 11 students complete the theory topics and the Controlled Assessment.

    Exam 01: Computer Systems

    Covers knowledge around computer system, their origins, use, security, ethical and environmental considerations.

    Exam 02: Computational Thinking Algorithms and Programming

    Covers knowledge around problem solving as well as programming concepts, application and techniques.

    Controlled Assessment

    An investigative computing task, chosen from a list provided by OCR, which assesses the following: research, technical understanding, analysis of problem, historical perspective, use of technical writing skills recommendations/evaluation.

    Students will need to:

    • Understand standard programming techniques

    • Be able to design a coded solution to a problem including the ability to:

      • Develop a suitable scenario

      • Design suitable input and output formats

      • Identify suitable variables and structures

      • Identify test procedures.

    • Create a coded solution fully annotating the developed code to explain its function

    • Test their solution:

      • To show functionality

      • To show how it matches the design criteria

      • Identifying successes and any limitations.

     

    GCSE ICT - Edexcel GCSE in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) (2IT01)

    Students study this course four periods a fortnight as an option subject. For further details, please click on the resources link.

    Edexcel GCSE in ICT  http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/ict-2010.html

    Skills

    The GCSE in ICT provides students with the opportunity to develop the following skills:

    • Think creatively, logically and critically

    • Select, use and integrate ICT tools and techniques to meet needs

    • Find, select and evaluate information for its relevance, value, accuracy and plausibility

    • Manipulate and process data and other information, sequence instructions, model situations and explore ideas

    • Communicate data and information in a form fit for purpose

    • Adopt safe, secure and responsible practice when using ICT

    • Develop appropriate and effective ICT-based solutions in a range of contexts

    • Evaluate their own and others’ use of ICT Students will learn to become independent and astute users of ICT.

    They develop knowledge and understanding of:

    · Current and emerging technologies and their impact on individuals, organisations and society

    · A range of ICT tools and techniques and the ways they are used in order to solve problems

     · Legal, social, economic, ethical and environmental implications of the use of ICT

     · Issues of risk, safety, security and responsible use of ICT

     · Collaborative working

    The Edexcel GCSE ICT course involves students undertaking two units, one examination worth 40% of the total marks, and one controlled assessment worth 60%. Students who follow this course will undertake the following units:

    Unit title and summary

    Assessment

    Time allocated

    Weighting

    UNIT 1: Living in a Digital World
     

    In this unit, students explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society. Students learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by their use in a range of contexts (learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and well-being, on the move). They develop awareness of the risks that are inherent in using ICT and the features of safe, secure and responsible practice.

    Written paper

    Externally assessed

    Students will have
    90 minutes for the written paper

    40%
     

    UNIT 2: Using Digital Tools
     

    This is a practical unit. Students broaden and enhance their ICT skills and capability. They work with a range of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts. Students learn to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT and to adopt safe, secure and responsible practice. They put into practice what they learned about digital technology

    Controlled Assessment Brief
    (CAB)
     
    provided by Edexcel, marked by teachers and moderated by
    Edexcel

    Students have 
    40 hours to complete the CAB

    60%

    Key Stage 5 - Years 12 & 13 - AQA GCE in ICT

    This is a perfect course for those who wish to go on to higher education courses or employment where understanding how ICT can be used in society and business (and the implications of its use) will be a valuable asset. The course is broken down into four key areas:

    At AS, the two units are complementary and are concerned with applying ICT to solve problems and the study of the opportunities for and effects of using ICT in the world today.  Candidates will have the opportunity to put into practice a wide range of software and hardware to create solutions to solve problems.

    At A2, students will study the concepts associated with the use of ICT in the 21st century. They will also have opportunities for acquiring skills needed in the IT profession such as co-operative working and project management. These practical skills can be developed in areas of ICT that are of interest to them. Students can also use these newly acquired skills as a springboard into other qualifications and working environments. In Y13, students will use ICT to design a Project of their choice e.g. Website design, Game Design, Animation, Graphic design and Database design etc.

     

    Key Stage 5 – Years 12 & 13 – AQA GCE Computer Science in ICT

    Students must complete 2 Exams and one Non-Exam Assessment assigned by AQA. They are internally assessed against AQA criteria and externally moderated.

    In year 12, students will learn theory needed for the 2 exam papers. During this time, they will complete a number of programming projects developing their programming skills and embedding additional skills such as analysis, design and computational thinking skills they will need for the Non-Exam Assessment project.

    In Year 13 students complete the theory topics and the Non-Exam Assessment.

    Paper 1:

    This paper tests a student's ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of computer science subjects such as; programming, data structures, algorithms and theory of computation and the skills around problem solving.

    Paper 2:

    This paper tests a student's ability to answer questions about data representation, computer systems, computer organisation and architecture, consequences of uses of computing, communication and networking, databases, big data and functional programming.

    Non-Exam Assessment

    The non-exam assessment assesses student's ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve or investigate a practical problem. Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem solving.

     

    Students will need to:

    • Understand and implement advanced programming techniques

    • Understand and implement advanced programming concepts

    • Be able to design a coded solution to a problem including the ability to:

      • Develop suitable scenario

      • Design and develop suitable and efficient algorithms

      • Identify and develop suitable data structures and programming techniques such as searching and sorting.

      • Carry out effective testing plans and procedures.

      • Introduce and provide solutions for complicated algorithmic problems.

    • Create a coded solution fully annotating the developed code to explain its function

    • Test their solution:

      • To show functionality

      • To show how it matches the design criteria

      • Identifying successes and any limitations.

     

    09/11/2016

     

    GCSE Business Studies  (Currently being reviewed 09/11/16)

     

    Information GCSE

    • 1 GCSE separated into 3 Units through Edexcel
    • Unit 1 is a 45 Minute Multiple Choice Exam which will take place in May/June of Year 11, worth 25% of the overall grade.
    • Unit 2 is Controlled Assessment; research is carried out by the student independently on a local business of their choice in relation to questions provided by the exam board. Once carried out, the students then have a 3 hour write up to analyse the data and discuss their findings. This will take place in the summer term of Year 10. Worth 25% of the overall grade.
    • Unit 3 is a 1 Hour 30 min Exam which will take place in May/June of Year 11, this contains much more extended writing, with higher level skills assessed. Worth 50% of the overall grade.
    • Revision Guides and Work books are available to buy from school

    Useful Websites

    Subject Specific Suggestions

    • Watch the news as often as possible to keep up with current affairs
    • Read a newspaper, especially the Business Section again to keep up with current affairs
    • Read through the definition guide provided to ensure you remember the subject specific terminology, enabling you to use it  within your answers
    • Once you are confident with the assessment criteria and the knowledge, set yourself or friends questions to test your skills using businesses currently in the news. E.g. – How much of a factor is the emergence of Apple causing BlackBerry in making huge loses and potentially going into administration 
      -Knowledge – Application – Analysis - Evaluation
    • You cannot answer questions if you don’t have the knowledge in the first place, so read through all class notes and revision guides, complete homework and respond to feedback, always ask for help in and out of the class if required, and use the previous exam papers available to hone you’re your exam skills to achieve those top marks.
    • Never settle for your target grade.

     

    Modern Foreign Languages (French, German, Spanish)

    Year 7

    Students in year 7 presently follow a carousel of foreign languages. Each student will study a term of French, German and Spanish. Students are set at the start of year 7, based on their English levels in Key Stage 2. The curriculum introduces students to the basics in all three languages in topics such as Me and My Family. There is the possible to reset students, if appropriate, at the end of the year.

    Year 8

    Students continue the carousel in year 8, developing the learning of languages through a range of topics, such as My School, My Home, My free time. At the end of the year, students are allowed to opt for one of the three languages to continue in year 9.

    Year 9

    Students study their opted language up to Easter. They will develop their acquisition of foreign languages through a wider range of topics. Where possible, students will be set, or will be in mixed ability groups. Students will start to study the GCSE curriculum after Easter of year 9.

    Year 10

    GCSE students follow the AQA course. Students will study the foreign language through topics within the three main themes of identity and culture, local, national, international and global areas of interest, and current and future study and employment.

    The GCSE course involves examinations in the four skills of Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing. All four skills are examined at the end of the two years through an external examination. Pupils are expected to purchase a good foreign language dictionary and revision guide at the start of the GCSE course which will assist them in their revision.

    Year 11

    GCSE students continue with the second year of the course. Students are examined at the end of y11 in all four skills either at Foundation level or Higher Level through external examinations.

    Year 12

    There is currently A Level provision for French at Sir Graham Balfour. Students study A Level French with AQA and are examined in all papers at the end of year 13.  The core elements include social issues and trends, political and artistic culture and grammar. Students must study either one literary text and one film or two texts. Students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading and writing are assessed in each of the topic areas. Further information about the course can be found on the AQA website and by asking your Languages teacher.

    Year 13

    Students study the second year of A Level French with AQA and are examined in all papers at the end of the year. Students’ abilities are again tested in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Papers 1, 2 and 3 at the end of the course. All students studying MFL are encouraged to practise languages at home through the recommended MFL websites.

    09/11/16

     

    Art & Design  (Currently being reviewed 09/11/16)

    Our aim is to encourage and promote the enjoyment, discipline and confidence that good art teaching brings by enabling our students to produce a wide range of artwork and experience the work of other artists and designers. The National Curriculum and its attainment target of "Knowledge, Skills and Understanding" in Art forms the basis of our students’ experience at Key Stage 3. At Key Stage 4 all students follow the AQA Art and Design syllabus.

    Key Stage Three

    At this key stage pupils work on a carousel and experience at least one term of Art over the year. The pupils experience drawing and painting with a variety of materials, and mixed media work including painting and clay. All work produced by students is assessed on a regular basis and progress is measured against previous performance as well as Key Stage 3 National Curriculum levels of attainment. The monitoring of Key Stage 3 progress includes regular target setting, reviewing and marking of homework and class work, reporting to parents, and discussing work with students both individually and in groups. Students are encouraged to discuss and critically review their own work as they progress throughout the Key Stage.

    Year 7

    Our schemes of work are designed to introduce students to the basic visual elements of Art alongside the skills required to produce good quality drawings. Students cover three projects over the year. They are introduced to the drawing skills and visual elements and study the work of Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, colour and self-portraits. Different cultures are explored this year and we study aboriginal art culminating in the creation of an aboriginal inspired clay model.

    Year 8

    In Year 8 we build upon the key observational drawing techniques and introduce students to abstract art. Students research Kandinsky and Hundertwasser’s use of colour and pattern and are encouraged to use his ideas as a starting point for developing their own final pieces. Three dimensional work completed in Year 7 is built upon and students create a Pfannerstill inspired shoe. In the latter part of the year they are encouraged to experiment with a variety of media in their analytical drawings based on litter.

    Year 9

    Students in Year 9 have one lesson of Art per week enabling them to really embed the key skills learned throughout Year 7 and 8. They begin the year with our popular observational drawing unit based on chocolates. This focuses on the key skills required to ensure a smooth transition to GCSE Art and Design. Students research and present their work in their own original way and learn the skills needed for GCSE Art. Painting skills are built upon during our Impressionism unit and students are able to create a group piece inspired by Monet.

    All students in Key Stage 3 have the opportunity to study Art in extra-curricular time; we run art clubs for Key Stage 3 students three lunch times a week, giving students a chance to work in smaller groups on intensive projects.

    Years 10 & 11

    At Key Stage 4 all students follow the AQA Art and Design syllabus. We are committed to helping our GCSE students gain success in their exam by at least achieving their predicted level and we anticipate many will exceed this if they are prepared to put in the required effort.
    The GCSE course includes three coursework projects over two years and a final exam project. The coursework is worth 60% and the exam 40% of the final mark. Students base their projects around two of the three major themes, and they are taught to manage time and visual evidence to best effect. GCSE students are expected to spend at least two hours every week on coursework; some of this is research evidence gathered for projects, some is analytical drawing and some is creative development.

    A Level

    At Key Stage 5 all students follow the AQA Fine Art syllabus for Art and Design. A level students are introduced to a variety of experiences employing a range of media, processes and techniques appropriate to the chosen area of study. The units are designed to develop their interest of and enjoyment in, the study of art and develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures from their own strengths and interests within the remit of the specification.
     

    Component 1 – Personal Investigation

    This is a practical investigation supported by written material.

    Students are required to conduct a practical investigation, into an idea, issue, concept or theme, supported by written material. The focus of the investigation must be identified independently by the student and must lead to a finished outcome or a series of related finished outcomes.

     

    Component 2 – Externally set assignment

    Separate question papers will be provided for each title. Each question paper will consist of a choice of eight questions to be used as starting points. Students are required to select one. Students will be provided with examination papers on 1 February, or as soon as possible after that date. Following the preparatory period, students must complete 15 hours of unaided, supervised time.

     

    20/11/15

    Music

     

    Year 7

    In Year 7, students are on a carousel with Art and Computing which means they have a term of Music, with two lessons a week. The year starts with a topic on learning to read and write basic rhythms before we move on to notating pitches. Children then put their skills into practise on the keyboards and compose and perform their own melodies. Students finish Year 7 Music by undertaking an individual project to develop their knowledge and understanding of the families of instruments.

    Year 8

    During the term of Music in Year 8 we cover Music for Adverts which involves creating a product and writing a voiceover and backing music which is then recorded. The second topic is Popular Music which includes performing a cover version of a pop or rap song, and then composing their own piece using four chords and a range of instruments including guitars and keyboards.

    Year 9

    During Year 9 preparation begins for those who wish to study GCSE Music at Key Stage 4. Students have Music for 1 hour every week throughout the school year. We study six topics which are designed with the GCSE specification in mind:

    • Programme and Film Music
    • Fanfares and Music for an Occasion
    • Ground Bass with Theme and Variations
    • Indian Music
    • African Music
    • Dance Music

    Years 10 & 11

    At Key Stage Four we currently follow the OCR specification.

    30% of this course is performance; one solo and one ensemble piece, which is worked on with our visiting instrumental and vocal teachers.

    A further 30% of the GCSE is composing. Students can use computer software to create two of their own pieces of music, which must be in contrasting styles.

    The final 40% of the course is an exam paper which is taken at the end of Year 11. Students study many genres ranging from the Classical era to popular modern music of today and are tested on their listening skills. Their knowledge of these styles also helps to inform the coursework.

    Years 12 & 13

    Students are able to continue their musical studies as part of the Stafford Collegiate.
     

    Instrumental and singing lessons

    We have a range of visiting tutors who provide lessons in woodwind, brass, strings, drum kit and keyboard, as well as singing for both boys and girls. Children who take up these lessons are encouraged to be part of the school choir or orchestra and perform regularly at care homes and theatres such as the Stafford Gatehouse. We also put on a Christmas and a Summer Concert held in school.

     

    09/11/2016

     

    Technology

    Throughout Year 7, 8 and 9 we operate a carousel where students will study Graphic Products, Resistant Materials, Textiles and Food Technology. The four subjects are studied in evenly spaced rotations and also cover key core skills to prepare students for KS4 controlled assessment.

    Graphic Products

    Year 7

    Drawing styles, rendering, adding textures, isometric drawing by hand and on the computer, cities using a CAD package, paper engineering, recycling and basic electrical circuits. Design and make a paper lamp.

    Year 8

    Lego instructional leaflet and packaging, Exploded assembly drawings using CAD, One point perspective drawing technique on the computer. Studying levers, designers and making a wooden bird mobile.

    Year 9

    Researching famous designers, Design Briefs and Specifications, and different types of motion. Design and make an electronic map display board.

    Year 10

    Graphic Products GCSE

    Printing and finishing processes, drawing techniques, 2D to 3D construction, mini project, Start major project. Exam theory focus. Use of CAD.

    Year 11

    Year 11 consists of students working through their chosen major project (which changes in topic every 2 years), examination preparation and examination answering techniques. Revision guides are available from the school shop. Past papers available in book form from the school shop.

    Examination is taken in May/June of Year 11. Revision tasks will run from after February half Term until the summer examination date.

    The Exam theme will be released in March on the AQA website below


     

    Useful websites include:-

    www.aqa.com

    www.technologystudent.com

    http://www.design-technology.info

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/graphics/

    http://www.robertsabuda.com/

    http://www.alessi.com

    http://designmuseum.org/design/jock-kinneir-margaret-calvert

    http://www.wallyolins.com/

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/tomorrowsworld/

     

    09/11/16

     

    Resistant materials

    Year 7

    Pencil block project or the hand steady game

    Year 8

    candleholder project

    Year 9

    Night light project, Hidden storage project

    Year 10

    Tools and machinery instruction, materials and processes theory. (Mini project, Clock) Start controlled assessment coursework)

    Year 11

    September, begin the making of the proposed project. Year 11 consists of students working through their chosen major project (which changes in topic every 2 years), examination preparation and examination answering techniques. Revision guides are available from the school shop. Past papers available in book form from the school shop. Please see www.aqa.com for the Resistant Materials specification. Examination is taken in May/June of Year 11. Revision tasks will run from after February half Term until the summer examination date. The Exam theme will be released in March on the AQA website above

    useful website include:-

    http//www.technologystudent.com

    http//www.aqagcseresistantmaterials.org.uk

    http://www.design-technology.info

     

    09/11/16

     

     

     

    Textile Technology

    Year 7

    Pencil Cases with an ‘Under the Sea’ theme.

    Year 8

    Chinese symbol bag project which explores a range of surface finishing techniques. 

    Year 9

    Personalised Cushions. Students choose their own theme.

    Year 10

    Mini controlled assessment example tasks:

    Monsoon industrial fashion project, Access skills (samples of textile techniques with detailed annotation of the method, areas for success and improvements), Wall hanging project, major controlled assessment project worth 60% of the overall grade.

    Year 11

    Year 11 consists of students working through their chosen major project (which changes in topic every 2 years), examination preparation and examination answering techniques. Revision guides are available from the school shop. Past papers available in book form from the school shop. Please see www.aqa.com for the Textile Technology specification. Examination is taken in May/June of Year 11. Revision tasks run after February half term until the summer examination date. The Exam theme will be released in March on the AQA website above. Students are encouraged to watch You Tube tutorials on how to do a type of stitch or how to make a Textiles product. This is good practice and promotes independent learning.

    Useful websites:-

    http://www.design-technology.info

    www.whaleys-bradford.ltd.uk/

    www.abakhan.co.uk

    www.hobbycraft.co.uk

    www.vogue.co.uk

    www.elledecoration.co.uk

    www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/textiles/

    www.aqa.org.uk

    09/11/16

     

     

    Food Technology

    Year 7

    Basic food hygiene alongside the Eatwell plate and the 4Cs are covered in depth. Practical consists of scones, pizza toast and breakfast muffins.

    Year 8

    Students are introduced to handling cooked meats and proteins alongside inputs on making a roux.  Practical include scone pizza, savoury rice, macaroni cheese and master bake, carrot cake.

    Year 9

    Theory goes into more depth with thickening methods, knife skills and kneading.  Practicals consist of mushroom risotto, cottage pie, lasagne, chicken fajitas and pizza.

    Year 10

    Cereals, pasta, small cakes, cook chill, food for the future.

    Year 11

    Year 11 consists of students working through their chosen major project (which changes in topic every 2 years), examination preparation and examination answering techniques. Revision guides are available from the school shop. Past papers are available in book form from the school shop. Please see www.aqa.com for the Food Technology specification. Examination taken in May/June of Year 11. Revision tasks will run from after February half Term until the summer examination date. The Exam theme will be released in March on the AQA website above

    Useful websites include:-

    www.nutrition.org.uk

    www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

    www.bbc.co.uk/food

    www.sainsburys.co.uk

    www.foodfocus.co.uk

    All practical making, testing and trialling, must be done in school under high supervision. Software: Food for a PC 6 should be used for nutritional and sensory analysis. Students are to use detailed exemplar help sheets given for each stage and each criterion. A detailed checklist given should be used by students to keep up to date. Controlled assessment catch up clinic is run at least once a week. Other times may be made by prior arrangement.

    09/11/16
     

     

    Child Development

    Year 10

    Unit 1 examination theory, start unit 2 (10 hour research task which is 20% of the overall GCSE grade)

    Year 11

    Start unit 3 child study worth 40% of the exam.

    Revision guides are available from the school shop. Past papers are available in lessons. Please see www.aqa.com for the Child Development specification. Coursework is worth 60% Deadline February of yr11 (Unit 2 = 20% Unit 3 = 40%). Unit 1 Examination is taken in June of Year worth 40% of overall grade

    Useful websites include:-

    www.childdevelopmentinfo.com

    www.zerotothree.org

    www.pampers.co.uk

    www.nurseryworld.magazine.co.uk

    www.kidshealth.org

    www.nhs.uk

    www.supernanny.co.uk

    09/11/16

     

    Health and Social Care GCSE (Edexcel)

    Year 10 and Year 11

    2 year course consisting of a 1 ½ hour exam at the end of Y11 (40% of total marks) and a controlled assessment of 4 tasks submitted at the end of Y11 (60% of total marks).

    Unit 1: This is the main basis for the exam.
    Understanding Personal Development and Relationships. This unit covers:
    • Lifestages
    • 4 aspects of human growth and development (PIES)
    • Understand the range of factors affecting growth and development
    • Understand how relationships affect growth and development
    • How expected and unexpected life events affect growth and development.

    Unit 2: This unit covers key areas for the controlled assessment.
    Exploring Health, Social Care and Early Years Provision. This unit covers:
    • Hierarchy of needs
    • Assessment of needs
    • How services are accessed and barriers to access
    • How services are provided
    • The role of workers in health, social care and early years settings
    • Understanding care values and how they are applied in health, social care and early years settings

    The 2 weeks work experience in the Summer of Y10 must be based in a health and social care setting in order to complete a detailed case study on which the controlled assessment is based.

    09/11/16

     

    Engineering

    Year 10

    Year 10 GCSE Engineering is based mainly on practical based theory lessons which consist of students learning how to use traditional engineering equipment such as the miller and centre lathe against the modern equipment and use of CAD/CAM. The first project allows students to practise a range of fixing whether permanent or temporary, how to mark out sheet steel accurately as well as using the line bender and planishing tools. In the summer term of Y10, all students will choose an engineering context to start and base their coursework on. 

    Year 11

    Year 11 GCSE Engineering coursework is 60% of the final grade which will be the main focus throughout Year 11 and involves both a portfolio/folder and practical/engineered product. The remaining part of the course is a written exam in the summer which represents 40% of the course.

    09/11/16

     

    Product Design

    Year 12

    Performance analysis research (section A)

    Materials and components research (Section B)

    Manufacturing analysis (section C)

    Quality control and Quality Assurance in the manufacturing process (Section D)

    Final specialised portfolio project from specification to evaluation

    Examination preparation. (see the specification on Year 12 Examination Preparation)

     

    Year 13

    Working with a client

    Final specialised portfolio project from initial research to evaluation

    Examination preparation. (see the specification on Year 13 Examination Preparation)

    09/11/16

     

     

     

    PE

    Year 7

    Students take part in a range of activities. We offer a number of sports such as; football, netball, rugby, multiskills, handball, basketball, gymnastics, trampolining, health related fitness, striking games, tennis and athletics. Alongside the practical element of the course students are also taught about the human body, the importance of exercise and the components of fitness.

    All activities enhance student performance and their understanding of sport. They also build confidence, sportsmanship, teamwork and determination.

    Fitness levels are assessed twice a year. Tests include: endurance, coordination, agility, balance, flexibility and speed.

    Further information on the PE National Curriculum can be found www.education.gov.uk

    Year 8

    Fitness levels are assessed twice a year. Tests include: endurance, coordination, agility, balance, flexibility and speed.

    Students take part in a range of activities. We offer a number of sports such as; ultimate frisbee, gaelic football, rugby, multiskills, handball, gymnastics, trampolining, health related fitness, striking games, tennis and athletics. Alongside the practical element of the course students are also taught about the human body, the long term and short term effects exercise and the components of fitness.

    Students develop teamwork, communication, organisational and leadership skills.

    Further information on the PE National Curriculum can be found www.education.gov.uk

    Year 9

    Leadership is a clear focus in year 9 and students are encouraged to take on roles within lessons to enhance these skills.

    Students take part in a range of activities. We offer a number of sports such as; football, basketball, rugby, gymnastics, trampolining, health related fitness, striking games, tennis and athletics. Alongside the practical element of the course students are also taught about the human body, the importance of exercise and the components of fitness.

    Fitness levels are assessed twice a year. Tests include: endurance, coordination, agility, balance, flexibility and speed.

    Further information on the PE National Curriculum can be found www.education.gov.uk

    Year 10

    Core PE

    Students engage in a range of sports including: volleyball, gaelic football, table tennis, climbing, trampolining, health related fitness, striking games, athletics and tennis. Students build on practical ability from key stage 3 and develop further knowledge to enhance their sporting ability.

    In addition students undergo fitness testing twice a year and they continue to develop knowledge on the human body and the importance of exercise.

    Year 11

    CORE PE

    Students engage in a range of sports including; volleyball, gaelic football, table tennis, climbing, trampolining, health related fitness, striking games, athletics and tennis. Students build on practical ability from key stage 3 and develop further knowledge to enhance their sporting ability.

    In addition students undergo fitness testing twice a year and they continue to develop knowledge on the human body and the importance of exercise. Students are encouraged to think about sport and exercise and how they can continue lead a healthy lifestyle.

    GCSE PE

    GCSE PE consists of a theory element which makes up 60% of the marks. Students will study a number of topics which include; the human body, factors affecting participation, diet, training, international sport and media in sport – assessed with two written examinations.
    40% of the marks are gained from the practical element of the course. Students need to participate in 3 practical sports and produce a written analysis of one of their sports.

    For further information www.aqa.org.uk

    A Level PE

    This is a two year course where students will study Sport and the Human Body at an advanced level.

    The content of the course will be run over the two years, where students will study the following units;

    • Applied anatomy and physiology
    • Skill acquisition
    • Sport and society
    • Exercise physiology and biomechanics
    • Sport psychology
    • Sport and society and technology in sport

    Students will also be required to demonstrate and prove performance in their chosen sport.

    Assessment will take the form of two written examinations, a practical performance and a written analysis of performance.

     

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    SMSC

     

    SMSC stands for spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.

    Mission Statement

    SMSC at Sir Graham Balfour School attempts to address the following key aims:

    To make students aware of the Values and Attitudes needed to be successful in life in the 21st century.
     
    To give students the tools to:

    • Develop a spiritual nature
    • Develop a moral compass
    • To promote understanding and acceptance of society and the cultures within it.

    Year 7

    In year 7 students study a cross curricular module with Geography and History on Cambodia, ‘Who am I?’ and ‘Rights and Responsibilities’.  They have to complete some interesting homework projects which include treasure boxes and advent calendars.

    Year 8

    The year 8 students study ‘Creation stories’ where they look at many stories from religion, science and various cultures.  They also study ‘Festival and Celebrations’ and ‘Inspirational People’ where again they complete a homework project on a particular inspirational person.

    Year 9

    In year 9 the students study ‘Evil and Suffering’, ‘Democracy’, ‘Debating’ and ‘Politics’.  There are many opportunities for discussion and debate within all of these topics and we begin to approach the schemes of work from a more philosophical point of view.

    Year 10

    In year 10 students study ‘Religion, Sport and Leisure’, which covers many topics including 'Sport and Religion', 'Homosexuality and Sport',  students also get the opportunity to film a news programme based on what we have studied in class.  We also study ‘War and Conflict’ and ‘Crime and Punishment’.

    Year 11

    In the final year of the SMSC scheme we move onto more ethical issues such as ‘Medical Ethics’ we then go on to complete a ‘Life Skills’ scheme where we look at important issues mental health, dealing with money and domestic violence.

    Religious Studies

    Year 10

    Beliefs and teachings (Christianity)

    • The nature of God

    • The concept of God as a Trinity of persons

    • Biblical accounts of Creation

    • The problem of evil and suffering and a loving and righteous God

    • Jesus Christ

    • The incarnation, crucifixion, resurrection and ascension

    • The concept of salvation

    • Eschatological beliefs and teachings

     

    Practices

    • The role and importance of pilgrimage

    • The role of the Church in the local community and living practices

    • The role of the Church in the wider world

     

    Beliefs and teachings (Buddhism)

    • Buddha and Enlightenment

    • The Dhamma

    • The first noble truth

    • The second noble truth

    • The third noble truth

    • The fourth noble truth

    • The human personality

    • Human destiny

    • Ethical teachings

    • The application of Buddhist principles in modern life

     

    Practices

    • Sacred and significant spaces and places for Buddhists

    • The Sangha

    • Attitudes to death and mourning

     

    Year 11

    Religion, philosophy and ethics in the modern world (Christian)

    • Relationships and families

    • The existence of God

    • Religion, peace and conflict

    • Dialogue within and between religious and non-religious beliefs and attitudes

     

    Exam structure

    • Beliefs and teachings, and practices: Christianity 1 hour paper, 63 marks 25%

    • Beliefs and teachings, and practices: Buddhism 1 hour paper, 63 marks 25%

    • Religion, philosophy and ethics in the modern world: Christianity 2 hour paper, 126 marks 50%


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    BTEC Travel and Tourism  

    This qualification has been developed to provide an engaging and stimulating introduction to the travel and tourism industry. It includes two core units that form the fundamental knowledge and understanding of the travel and tourism sector, followed by two further units designed to develop specific knowledge of the travel and tourism sector.
    The core units are:

    • Unit 1: The UK Travel and Tourism Sector – this unit covers the main types of tourism in the UK, the contribution that travel and tourism makes to the UK economy and the different component industries that make up the UK travel and tourism sector.
    • Unit 2: UK Travel and Tourism Destinations – this unit covers what the different types of UK destinations have to offer, as well as locating tourist UK destinations and routes.

    The further units are:
     

    • Unit 3: The Development of Travel and Tourism in the UK – which looks at developments that have shaped the sector and how the UK travel and tourism industry has develope

    This qualification has been developed to provide an engaging and stimulating introduction to the travel and tourism industry. It includes two core units that form the fundamental knowledge and understanding of the travel and tourism sector, followed by two further units designed to develop specific knowledge of the travel and tourism sector.
     

    The core units are:

    • Unit 1: The UK Travel and Tourism Sector – this unit covers the main types of tourism in the UK, the contribution that travel and tourism makes to the UK economy and the different component industries that make up the UK travel and tourism sector.  
    • Unit 2: UK Travel and Tourism Destinations – this unit covers what the different types of UK destinations have to offer, as well as locating tourist UK destinations and routes. 
       

    The further units are:

    • Unit 4: International Travel and Tourism Destinations – which looks at international travel and tourism destinations and gateways and reasons for their appeal to different visitors. 
       
    • Unit 5: Factors affecting Worldwide Travel and Tourism – which looks at how worldwide variables such as time zones, the climate of a destination, specific weather conditions (such as the monsoon and hurricanes), passport and visa requirements and short term emergencies (such as terrorism and natural hazards like volcanoes) can affect people on their travels.


      The Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Travel and Tourism includes an external assessment for Unit 1. This will take the form of a 60 minute 50 mark examination taken at the end of the course and is worth ¼ of the final award. The other three units are assessed using an internally assessed portfolio of evidence. Internal assessment enables learners to receive feedback on their progress throughout the course as they gather and provide the evidence required.
      Students will study 4 Units across the course which will result in either Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction Plus (the equivalent of 1 GCSE at C-B-A- A* grades).
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